Companionship Can Chase Away the Blues | Companion Care
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Companionship Can Chase Away the Blues

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If you can’t be with your loved one during the holidays (or any other time), our Daughter/Son Down the Street services may be the answer!

“Daughter/Son Down the Street” Companion Service
Some clients don’t require medical assistance, but would like a friendly visit or a companion on excursions about town.  A “Daughter/Son Down the Street” is available to visit the National Gallery of Art, take afternoon tea, have lunch at the club, play a game of chess, or attend a concert at the Kennedy Center.

A stimulating companion helps keep seniors involved in activities they’ve enjoyed in the past. Keeping their world as “open” as possible helps avoid depression & feelings of isolation.

Dr. Vicki Rackner, MD shares this advice about ‘holiday blues’ and depression
The holiday season is quickly coming upon us. If you are a caregiver for an elderly loved one, you may notice a change in your loved one’s mood as the holidays approach. Perhaps you are one of many, who visit elderly parents and family during the holidays who live a distance away. When you visit you may notice that loved ones are not as physically active, or they show symptoms of fatigue or sadness and have no interest in the holiday or in their surroundings.

According to the National Institutes of Health; of the 35 million Americans age 65 or older, about 2 million suffer from full-blown depression. Another 5 million suffer from less severe forms of the illness. This represents about 20% of the senior population — a significant proportion.

Depression in the elderly is difficult to diagnose and is frequently untreated. The symptoms may be confused with a medical illness, dementia, or malnutrition due to a poor diet. Many older people will not accept the idea that they have depression and refuse to seek treatment.

As a care giver or family member of a depressed older person, make it your responsibility to get involved. The elder person generally denies any problems or may fear being mentally ill. You can make the difference in and remove the Holiday Blues from seniors suffering from depression. The Geriatric Mental Health Foundation offers a “Depression Tool Kit.”

Click here for more information and the tool kit