Booming Adventures

Patt Osborne wasn’t happy with a quiet retirement life. The former teacher wasn’t ready to sit at home and knit, she wanted adventure. Patt imagined that there were others out there who wanted a little more excitement, no matter their age.

Patt founded Boomer Chick Adventures in New Jersey, a company that designs outdoor excursions tailored to inspire women in the baby boomer generation to get out and move. Though women and men of all ages are welcome, Patt felt it was important that women be encouraged to get outdoors as they age.  

“Being outdoors, whether in the woods, on a mountain peak, seaside, lakeside, or just reading on my deck, this is where I draw my strength and become energized,” Patt explains. The most popular events are hiking, kayaking and tubing, though the group has expanded to cultural events like tea ceremonies.

What can we learn from Patt and the Boomer Chick adventurers? That retirement is not the time to slow down, but the time to embrace new challenges and interests. It’s a time to learn new skills, enjoy physical activity and experience the world through travel and culture.

If you’re not sure how to start something new, look for a group like Patt’s that caters to older clientele. There are plenty of organizations that can help with travel, technology and learning, all tailored to senior clients. There are also a number of colleges that offer free classes that range from academic to artistic. If you’d like to spend your retirement learning, look here for the classes available in your state.

Don’t allow your retirement to be the end of your adventuring. Take a hike, learn a new language, or embrace another culture. Retirement is a time to expand your horizons, not shrink them.

 

Aging In Place

Most aging Americans have a dream about aging in place. To do this, homes may need to be refitted with safety in mind. Grab bars might need to be installed in bathrooms, a chair lift might need to be added to the stairs, and perhaps a ramp and wheelchair accessible halls and doorways. It can be costly to refurbish a house for older residents, so seniors should consult a builder or look at suggested housing updates here.   

Beyond better lighting and safety features, what other things can you do to help ensure you can age in place?

There are several different forms of technology that are designed to aid seniors in their homes. Beyond fall detection devices, there are now medication dispensing machines, sensors that can help track senior movements, and tablets or video chatting devices that will make staying connected to family members easy. If seniors don’t feel comfortable using technology, and don’t have a younger friend or relative that can show them the ropes, there are often classes at local senior centers that will show you how to operate essential devices.

Communities also have a role to play in successful aging in place. The Morningside Gardens community on the Upper West Side of New York City has made a concerted effort to refit their community with their older members in mind. Their new community center has been redesigned with senior mobility in mind. The center also offers senior-tailored health services and social programs to foster a sense of greater community and combat feelings of isolation that often plague seniors.

Finally, in the near future, if you want to age at home, you may need a companion – one that comes with a charger. Toyota recently invested $14 million into the development of an aging in place robot. The ElliQ is a revolutionary robot that works with a tablet to help seniors control technology in their households as well as connect with the outside world.

Aging in place is becoming an attainable goal as technology improves. Work with senior loved ones to prepare and the transition should be smooth.